Haha I’m glad you finally got to see it! It’s strange that you had to see it when it’s spring and it’s warm ^__^
The cold never bothered me anyway~♪ *blizzard of cherry blossoms falling…sob*
Muuuuahhh my Naughty! (from 3am Tokyo XD)
 

me : I already watched frozen though… the release of frozen was toooo late in Japan!!

friend: Indeed!
So which character did you like?

me: I LOOVE kristoff really!  Kinda I ship him<3


friend: Well well well, …with whom? *Maleficent’s evil smile*

me: w, whom? I’m not sure,
But if I have to choose one…*thinking with folded arms*

image

 

vejiicakes:

we kept our secrets and rules [fullview at ao3]

Gift illustration for the wonderful drcalvin, based on her own deliciously dark Madeleine-era steampunk dystopia The Tale of Hundred-Faced Jean & the Brass-Hearted Inspector [x]

(Made as part of our second miseres exchange [x], for the request “Valjean, Javert; What-If Scenario”)

 
rereadinglesmis:

The ambush sequence, while long, is important in a lot of ways. Not only is it a turning point for Thenardier, Valjean, and Marius, but it shows a side of Javert that we don’t see very often: the heroic protector of society.
We see him pursue Valjean across the years in service of an unjust law.
We see him persecute Fantine on the say-so of someone who just happens to look more respectable than she does.
We see him infiltrating the student uprising (though to be fair, that’s a matter of perspective — he’s only the “bad guy” because the rebels are our viewpoint characters).
Here, placing him against Thenardier and Patron-Minette, we see Javert at his best.  There’s no moral ambiguity. They’re the bad guys, he’s the good guy, and he’s actually pretty damn badass. It’s what sets an antagonist apart from a flat-out villain, and what gives him a depth of character that makes him almost appealing.
It reminds me of something J.Michael Straczynski said about Bester, the Psi-Cop played by Walter Koenig on Babylon 5: After a few appearances, “the next time we saw him, he either had to win, or he had to be right. If he lost again, it’d cut his credibility out.” Without this scene, Javert remains a caricature, a symbol of law as villain. With it, we see him win and be right, and we get to see that his personal view of himself isn’t completely self-delusion. 
Javert’s problem is that he sees the world in such black-and-white terms that everyone who has transgressed, however minor, becomes a criminal in his eyes, worthy of punishment rather than protection. Himself included, as seen when he confesses to M. Madeleine that he’s denounced his superior. (It must have been such a relief to learn that he’d been right all along about Madeleine’s identity.)

rereadinglesmis:

The ambush sequence, while long, is important in a lot of ways. Not only is it a turning point for Thenardier, Valjean, and Marius, but it shows a side of Javert that we don’t see very often: the heroic protector of society.

We see him pursue Valjean across the years in service of an unjust law.

We see him persecute Fantine on the say-so of someone who just happens to look more respectable than she does.

We see him infiltrating the student uprising (though to be fair, that’s a matter of perspective — he’s only the “bad guy” because the rebels are our viewpoint characters).

Here, placing him against Thenardier and Patron-Minette, we see Javert at his best.  There’s no moral ambiguity. They’re the bad guys, he’s the good guy, and he’s actually pretty damn badass. It’s what sets an antagonist apart from a flat-out villain, and what gives him a depth of character that makes him almost appealing.

It reminds me of something J.Michael Straczynski said about Bester, the Psi-Cop played by Walter Koenig on Babylon 5: After a few appearances, “the next time we saw him, he either had to win, or he had to be right. If he lost again, it’d cut his credibility out.” Without this scene, Javert remains a caricature, a symbol of law as villain. With it, we see him win and be right, and we get to see that his personal view of himself isn’t completely self-delusion. 


Javert’s problem is that he sees the world in such black-and-white terms that everyone who has transgressed, however minor, becomes a criminal in his eyes, worthy of punishment rather than protection. Himself included, as seen when he confesses to M. Madeleine that he’s denounced his superior. (It must have been such a relief to learn that he’d been right all along about Madeleine’s identity.)

 

nikoleto:

pinoqino said: Oh haha :) did you buy the “ぽってりショコラ” pocky? It means “little fat” That’s definitely the perfect Pocky for Crowe!vert i think XD

Is this.. Is this TRUE? I CAN’T BELIEVE IT’S TRUE OH MY GOODNESS. I DIDN’T KNOW. THIS IS PERFECT!

LOOK AT THIS LITTLE FATTY EATING LITTLE FAT POCKY <3

Haha! you drew it<3
How cute penguin you are *pompom*

 

lottiethroughthemirror:

New Phantom animated movie!

How is it that I haven’t heard of this before? 

We need to make this thing happen guys! It looks so Leroux accurate! 

Perfection! I’d love to see this movie!

 

artsistra:

I keep watching this video.
You can’t blame me for drooling over Perkins!vert and a little on Malko!vert ♥ and the song is too damn catchy. Watch it. You won’t regret it.

 

breadsports:

a hm javert i drew out of procrastination + extremely necessary closeup b/c zooming out makes it look ugly for some reason

 
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